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Special At-Risk Populations in Idaho

Special At-Risk Populations for Suicide in Idaho presents demographics, circumstance and risk and protective factor information about four groups identified as at high risk for suicide in Idaho. The four special at-risk groups are:

Teen Males, 15-17 Years Old

Teen males are the first of four special populations identified by the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW) as at special risk for suicide in Idaho.

As with the general population, while female teens attempt suicide more often, teen males are approximately six times more likely to succeed at completing suicide. The data presented below came from many sources, including the IDHW Bureau of Vital Statistics, Substance Use and School Climate Survey, Youth Risk Behavior Survey, Idaho State Police Crime Reports and others.

In some cases, the teen male data are shown in combination with female and other age group data as produced by the reporting agencies.

The data presented below show suicide incidence, circurmstance and related data for suicides of teen males ages 15 - 17 years old for the years of 2003 - 2009.
Notes & Remarks regarding the Teen Male data
Each report below presents an overview of published research literature, research and publically available data on topics of special interest to Idaho. 

The overview is intended to give a good introduction to current research regarding the topic and concludes with a selected bibliography.

The research bibliography for each topic presents a much wider sample of peer-reviewed research articles.  Many of the citations have links that goes to the abstract or full text of full journal article.

  • Teen Males & Suicide Report (ages 15-17) 
  • Teen Male Suicide Research Bibliographies:  2010  2009   2008  2007   2006   2005   2004   2003
  • Native American Males, 15-24 Years Old


    The second at high risk for suicide in Idaho are Native American males between the ages of 15 - 24 as identified by IDHW. The high prevalence of suicide among Native American young males has achieved widespread national recognition and concern. Nationally, suicide was the third leading cause of death among NAYM, ages 15 to 24.

    In response to the higher rate of suicides among Idaho’s NAYM, they have been selected as one of four special ‘at-risk’ populations for further study. The hope is that the research literature summarized below will support Idaho’s suicide prevention community in their efforts to understand NYAM suicide, identify youth at risk and raise family, school and tribal awareness of the signs and symptoms of NYAM suicides and to design and implement suicide prevention programs.

    The following data show the incidence, circumstance and related data for suicides of Native American Males ages 15-24 years.
    Each report below presents an overview of published research literature, research and publically available data on topics of special interest to Idaho. 

    The overview is intended to give a good introduction to current research regarding the topic and concludes with a selected bibliography.

    The research bibliography for each topic presents a much wider sample of peer-reviewed research articles. Many of the citations have links that goes to the abstract or full text of full journal article.

  • Native American Males & Suicide Report (ages 15-24)
  • Native American Male Suicide Research Bibliography:  2003-2010
  • Working Age Males, 18-64

    Historically, 18 – 64 year old males have exhibited a relatively low suicide rate and as a result, this group has traditionally been excluded from suicide prevention, awareness and screening programs, leaving them unaware of suicide risk factors and prevention programs. 

    Since 2000 however, there has been a significant increase in suicide among this population, and working age males are now considered a group at high-risk for suicide, and thus this group has been identifed by DHW as the third highest risk group for suicide in Idaho.

    Each report below presents an overview of published research literature, research and publically available data on topics of special interest to Idaho. 

    The overview is intended to give a good introduction to current research regarding the topic and concludes with a selected bibliography.

    The research bibliography for each topic presents a much wider sample of peer-reviewed research articles.  Many of the citations have links that goes to the abstract or full text of full journal article.

  • Working Age Males & Suicide Report (ages 18 - 64)
  • Working Age Male Suicide Research Bibliographies:  2010  2009  2008(a)   2008(b)   2007   2006   2005   2004   2003
  • Elderly Males, Ages 75+

    The suicide rate among elderly males, age 75 or older, is the highest of any special population. Estimates place the suicide rate for men 75 or older at 37.4 deaths per 100,000 and at 61.0 per 100,000 for men 85 or older. Within the elderly population, elderly men account for 81% of completed suicides, and white men who are age 85 and older had a rate of 49.8 suicide deaths per 100,000 or higher for the 85+ age group. This phenomenon is not limited to the United States, research shows men aged 75 years and older have the highest suicide rate among all age groups in almost all industrialized countries. 

    Men in this group have risk factors common to other populations, such as undetected or unmanaged depression, alcohol or drug use, and ready access to effective suicide means. They also have the risk factors that elevate suicide risk for men in general, such as poor or absent emotional reasoning skills, poor help seeking skills and fear of stigma from receiving mental health support. Men in this group also have the risk factors associated with working age males including grave health conditions, traditional male role pressures, changing or declining economic status, among others. 

    In addition to the burdens imposed by all of the risk factors above, a number of risk factors have been identified that are specific to men 75 years and older such as: loss of daily function, visual impairment, rapidly declining health, grief over the loss of their spouse, reduced living circumstances and social isolation. Given that a risk factor is defined as something that predisposes or increases the risk of a behavior or negative outcome, it should not be surprising that men 75 years and older have a very high risk of suicide. Even an elderly male with no suicidal tendencies carries a high risk for suicide.

    Each report below presents an overview of published research literature, research and publically available data on topics of special interest to Idaho. 

    The overview is intended to give a good introduction to current research regarding the topic and concludes with a selected bibliography.

    The research bibliography for each topic presents a much wider sample of peer-reviewed research articles. Many of the citations have links that goes to the abstract or full text of full journal article.

  • Age Group by Year of Death
  • Race and Ethnicity
  • Place of Injury by Year
  • Place of Death by Year
  • Method of Death by Year
  • Method of Death by Level of Education
  • Method of Death by Race
  • Marital Status
  • Military Status
  • Industry Classification by Year of Death
  • Month and Day of Death

  • Each report below presents an overview of published research literature, research and publically available data on topics of special interest to Idaho. The overview is intended to give a good introduction to current research regarding the topic and concludes with a selected bibliography. The research bibliography for each topic presents a much wider sample of peer-reviewed research articles. Many of the citations have links that goes to the abstract or full text of full journal article.

  • Elderly Males & Suicide Report (ages 75+)
  • Elderly Male Suicide Research Bibliographies:  2010  2009  2008  2007  2006  2005   2004   2003